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Anusim, Apellidos Sefardi, Sephardic and Crypto-Jewish identity, Sephardic Geneology, Sephardic Jews of Caribbean and Central America, Sephardic Surnames, Sephardim and Sephardica

The Sephardic Jews’s List Surnames

There are many lists of Sephardic surnames, but this is based on serious study of genealogy. Not everyone can be Sephardic, as this list shows the surnames themselves are Sephardic.

What are Sephardic Jews: Sephardi Jews (Hebrew: סְפָרַדִּי, Modern Sefaraddi Tiberian Səp̄āraddî, plural: Hebrew: סְפָרַדִּים, Modern Sefaraddim Tiberian Səp̄āraddîm; Spanish Sefardíes; Portuguese Sefarditas, Greek Σεφάρδοι Sefardoi, Bulgarian сефаради sefaradi, Turkish Sefarad, Judaeo-Spanish Sefardies, Arabic: سفارديون) are:

If your last name is not here does not mean that is not Jewish, it could mean that it was changed, or modified to be sound less Jewish. Many immigrants to modern Israel change their names to Hebrew names, to erase remnants of galuti (exiled) life still surviving in family names from other languages. This phenomenon was especially common among Ashkenazic Jewish immigrants to Israel, because most of their names were taken later and some were imposed by the German and Austro-Hungarian Empires.

In a narrow sense, Jews descended from the Jews of the Iberian Peninsula before their expulsion in the late 15th century;

In a broad sense, and particularly for religious purposes, Jews who use a Sephardic style of liturgy or otherwise define themselves in terms of the Jewish customs and traditions which originated in the Iberian Peninsula, whether or not they have any historical or ethnographic connection to the Iberian Peninsula. In this broader sense, the term Sephardim includes most Mizrahi Jews, and in Israel sometimes means any Jew who is not Ashkenazi.

Notice that many Sephardic surnames appear to be in the Arabic language. The Arabs and Moors, are given credit for brining surnames as we know them to Spain during their conquest.

Learn about Jewish last name meanings, Jewish surname origins, etymology of Hebrew Last Names. Have you ever wondered about the meaning of your last name or where your family surname came from? What your ancestors did, how they looked or where they lived? Surnames — our last names — tell a story about our family, one handed down for hundreds of years. By tracing the possible origin of your surname, you can learn more about the medieval ancestors who first bore the surname and, ultimately, handed it down to you. To learn more about your surname meaning and ethnic origin, just browse to the appropriate letter in the Surname Meanings and Origins Glossary for your last name.

Except for aristocrats, wealthy people and well off Jewish merchants did not get surnames in Eastern Europe until the Napoleonic years of the early 19th century. Most of the Jews from countries captured by Napoleon including Russia, Poland, and Germany were ordered to get surnames. The reason for the last names were for tax purposes. After Napoleon’s defeat many Jews dropped their surnames and returned to “son of” names like Mendelsohn, Jacobson, Levinson, etc. During the so called Emancipation, Jews were once more ordered to take on surnames. When Jews adopted family names in the 18th and 19th centuries, the choice was frequently the patronymic and first names thus became family names.

Sephardic Jews had surnames stretching back centuries. (Spain prior Ferdinand and Isabella was a golden spot for Jews) They were expelled by Isabella in the same year that Columbus discovered America. The earliest American Jews were Sephardic.

Knowing the naming patterns (and Hebrew holy names) can be very helpful in identifying ancestors and sorting generations.

Sephardic names translated into English from the Arabic (A), Africa (AF), Aramaic (AR), Basque (BA), Berber (B), Celtic (C), Dutch (DU), English, (E), French (F), German (D), Greek (G), Hebrew (H), Hebrew Biblical (HB), Hebrew Talmud (HT), Italian (I), Latin (L), Romany, Spanish (S), Portugues (P), Persian, Iran, Farsi (PE), Turkish (T), Yiddish (Y).

This list is posted in this website to help those who are seeking to learn more about the Jewish roots of their linage / lastname. Just because you have a Jewish lastname does not make a person Jewish; however, it could be that your family were Jews running away from the holy Catholic inquisition and perhaps converted to Catholisism in order to save their lives.

The Hebrew Scriptures speaks of that the the Sephardic Jews who were forsed to convert will come back, and seek back their heritage, the prophet Obadia speaks: 1:20 And the captivity of this host of the children of Israel shall possess that of the Canaanites, even unto Zarephath, and the captives of Jerusalem who are in Sefarad possess the cities of the Negev.

If your last name is not hear does not mean that is not Jewish, it could mean that it was changed, or modified to be sound less Jewish. Many immigrants to modern Israel change their names to Hebrew names, to erase remnants of galuti (exiled) life still surviving in family names from other languages. This phenomenon was especially common among Ashkenazic Jewish immigrants to Israel, because most of their names were taken later and some were imposed by the German and Austro-Hungarian Empires.
Check here for the  Surname   or   Lista de Apellidos

 
Many of this Jews started to recover their Jewish Identity but many don’t even know about it. Many still practice other religions and some have reverted to Judaism. This is the History of the Sephardim, the Jews of Spain and their exile. Every Jew has a story many more to tell. The Inquisition was finally abolished in 1821. The inquisition lasted 343 years and killed many Jewish lives as well as the lives of many others. It was by far the largest holocaust of all times. 87 years later in 1908 Pope Piux X renamed the inquisition in to Sagrada Congregación del Santo Oficio or in English as Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and is an organization that still active today in the Roman Catholic Church.

Alex Santi Pereiro from Montevideo, Uruguay. Director of genealogy Tarbut Shorashim, culture of the Jewish roots. http://www.tarbutsefarad.com/

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About Anni Orekh

Anni Orekh (which translated from Hebrew means: I m an editor (Publisher) it is the online pen-name of author and Managing Director of Hineni Publishing Group.

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